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Inspiring Quotes to boost your confidence

Inspiring Quotes

Below is a collection of Inspiring Quotes which will boost your confidence. Confidence is one off the most essential quality you must have to be successful in life. There are many ways to boost your confidence such are as reading, Positive thinking, practicing, training, positive Self Talk, and interacting with experts etc. These inspiring Quotes will definitely boost your self confidence.

Famous Inspiring Quotes to boost your confidence

“I have no special talents. I am only passionately curious.”
― Albert Einstein

Yes, Einstein himself admits that he doesn’t possess any god gifted talent. The only thing that kept him going was his curiosity and thirst for knowledge. He was an ordinary student in his school days. It is a proven fact that curiosity makes us smart, and gives us enough confidence to explore the unknown. Albert Einstein was one of the greatest scientist in history. The only thing that made him great was his curiosity, hard work and love of physics. You don’t need any special talent to be successful. The only thing you need is a will power to do things for a longer time period. You need a rock solid dedication and hard work. If you have these qualities, them there’s nothing that can stop you from achieving your goal.

“That which does not kill us makes us stronger.”
Friedrich Nietzsche

Have you tried to do something and failed miserably? If yes don’t lose your hopes. Because it is this struggle will make you stronger

“Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
― Oscar Wilde

Each one of you have your own unique qualities and talents. If you want to use all your natural talents and ability then, you should be yourself. We must act naturally, according to our character and instincts. Do what you think is right, and do not let other opinion influence your own thoughts. Don’t compare yourself to others, and be honest to your self.

“In three words I can sum up everything I’ve learned about life: it goes on.”
Robert Frost

If you have failed in the past don’t let that disappointment kill your enthusiasm. Life is all about learning new things and keep moving forward.

“I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”
― Thomas A. Edison

I love this inspiring quote from Thomas Edison. For me it is one of the best lesson i have learned in my life. Always be an optimist, only think positive. Even if you have failed don’t take it as a defeat. Each unsuccessful attempt is a learning lesson in life. And learning something new is the greatest thing you can do in life.

“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”
Eleanor Roosevelt

Never let other opinion’s make you feel inferior. You can not control what others think and tell about, because it’s not in your control. What really matter’s is what we think about ourselves. Ignore those that make you fearful and sad, that degrade you back towards misery. Stay close to like minded people who fan your flames.

“To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

Do not judge yourself or compare yourself with the society. Society will not support if are working on a new idea. We have seen it through the history, that society loughs at those who try any thing new. Have faith in your idea and don’t let others opinions kill your own thoughts.

“First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, and then you win.”
― Mahatma Gandhi

This inspiring quote from Mahatma Gandhi tells about the difficulties one faces while trying anything new. You must stand firmly with your idea until you succeed.


“It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.”
― André Gide

“The wound is the place where the Light enters you.”
― Rumi

Do not let temporary defeats bring your enthusiasm down. If you have failed, then there is a greater chances for your success. All those successful people failed initially, but with the help of there hard word and dedication they achieved what they wanted.

Don’t fear failure. — Not failure, but low aim, is the crime. In great attempts it is glorious even to fail.
― Bruce Lee

“Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, today is a gift of God, which is why we call it the present.”
― Bil Keane

“When I despair, I remember that all through history the way of truth and love have always won. There have been tyrants and murderers, and for a time, they can seem invincible, but in the end, they always fall. Think of it–always.”
Mahatma Gandhi

“You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You’re on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who’ll decide where to go…”
― Dr. Seuss

“Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.”
― Dalai Lama XIV

“Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.”
― Winston S. Churchill

“We cannot be sure of having something to live for unless we are willing to die for it.”
― Che Guevara

“Always do what you are afraid to do.”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

Doing something which makes you fearful, will give you courage and confidence. Anything that looks impossible at first sight becomes possible if you try to do it.

“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of other’s opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.”
― Steve Jobs

“Do what you feel in your heart to be right – for you’ll be criticized anyway.”
― Eleanor Roosevelt

“Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

“It is never too late to be what you might have been.”
― George Eliot

I think this inspiring quote by George Eliot is the perfect quote to ending this article. You still have time to do what you want to do. Start now ant commit yourself towards your goal. Reading Inspiring Quotes is very good source of daily inspiration. If can also add your famous inspiring quotes in the comment section.

See Also:-Inspirational Courage Quotes

Inspirational Fear quotes

Top 5 Dante Gabriel Rossetti Poems

Dante Gabriel Rossetti Poems
Dante Gabriel Rossetti

About Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Dante Gabriel Rossetti (12 May 1828 – 9 April 1882) was an English poet, illustrator, painter and translator. Dante Gabriel Rossetti poems are very inspirational and motivational. He founded the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848 with William Holman Hunt and John Everett Millais, and was later to be the main inspiration for a second generation of artists and writers influenced by the movement, most notably William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones. His work also influenced the European Symbolists and was a major precursor of the Aesthetic movement. Dante Gabriel Rossetti poems and other works were closely linked with his personal life.

Rossetti’s art was characterized by its sensuality and its medieval revivalism. His early poetry was influenced by John Keats. His later poetry was characterized by the complex interlinking of thought and feeling, especially in his sonnet sequence The House of Life. Poetry and image are closely entwined in Rossetti’s work; he frequently wrote sonnets to accompany his pictures, spanning from The Girlhood of Mary Virgin (1849) and Astarte Syriaca (1877), while also creating art to illustrate poems such as “Goblin Market” by the celebrated poet Christina Rossetti, his sister.

Top 5 Dante Gabriel Rossetti Poems

Below is a list of Top 5 Dante Gabriel Rossetti poems. These 5 Dante Gabriel Rossetti poems are very good source for your daily inspiration.

1)Dream-Love Poem by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Young Love lies sleeping
In May-time of the year,
Among the lilies,
Lapped in the tender light:
White lambs come grazing,
White doves come building there:
And round about him
The May-bushes are white.

Soft moss the pillow
For oh, a softer cheek;
Broad leaves cast shadow
Upon the heavy eyes:
There wind and waters
Grow lulled and scarcely speak;
There twilight lingers
The longest in the skies.

Young Love lies dreaming;
But who shall tell the dream?
A perfect sunlight
On rustling forest tips;
Or perfect moonlight
Upon a rippling stream;
Or perfect silence,
Or song of cherished lips.

Burn odours round him
To fill the drowsy air;
Weave silent dances
Around him to and fro;
For oh, in waking
The sights are no so fair,
And song and silence
Are not like these below.

Young Love lies dreaming
Till summer days are gone, –
Dreaming and drowsing
Away to perfect sleep:
He sees the beauty
Sun hath not looked upon,
And tastes the fountain
Unutterably deep.

Him perfect music
Doth hush unto his rest,
And through the pauses
The perfect silence calms:
Oh, poor the voices
Of earth from east to west,
And poor earth’s stillness
Between her stately palms.

Young Love lies drowsing
Away to poppied death;
Cool shadows deepen
Across the sleeping face:
So fails the summer
With warm delicious breath;
And what hath autumn
To give us in its place?

Draw close the curtains
Of branched evergreen;
Change cannot touch them
With fading fingers sere:
Here first the violets
Perhaps with bud unseen,
And a dove, may be,
Return to nestle here.

2)Autumn Song – Poem by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Know’st thou not at the fall of the leaf
How the heart feels a languid grief
Laid on it for a covering,
And how sleep seems a goodly thing
In Autumn at the fall of the leaf?

And how the swift beat of the brain
Falters because it is in vain,
In Autumn at the fall of the leaf
Knowest thou not? and how the chief
Of joys seems—not to suffer pain?

Know’st thou not at the fall of the leaf
How the soul feels like a dried sheaf
Bound up at length for harvesting,
And how death seems a comely thing
In Autumn at the fall of the leaf?

3)Broken Music Poem by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

The mother will not turn, who thinks she hears
Her nursling’s speech first grow articulate;
But breathless with averted eyes elate
She sits, with open lips and open ears,
That it may call her twice. ‘Mid doubts and fears
Thus oft my soul has hearkened; till the song,
A central moan for days, at length found tongue,
And the sweet music welled and the sweet tears.

But now, whatever while the soul is fain
To list that wonted murmur, as it were
The speech-bound sea-shell’s low importunate strain, –
No breath of song, thy voice alone is there,
O bitterly beloved! and all her gain
Is but the pang of unpermitted prayer.

4)A Little While Poem by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

A little while a little love
The hour yet bears for thee and me
Who have not drawn the veil to see
If still our heaven be lit above.
Thou merely, at the day’s last sigh,
Hast felt thy soul prolong the tone;
And I have heard the night-wind cry
And deemed its speech mine own.

A little while a little love
The scattering autumn hoards for us
Whose bower is not yet ruinous
Nor quite unleaved our songless grove.
Only across the shaken boughs
We hear the flood-tides seek the sea,
And deep in both our hearts they rouse
One wail for thee and me.

A little while a little love
May yet be ours who have not said
The word it makes our eyes afraid
To know that each is thinking of.
Not yet the end: be our lips dumb
In smiles a little season yet:
I’ll tell thee, when the end is come,
How we may best forget.

5)Silent Noon Poem by Dante Gabriel Rossett

Your hands lie open in the long fresh grass, —
The finger-points look through like rosy blooms:
Your eyes smile peace. The pasture gleams and glooms
‘Neath billowing skies that scatter and amass.
All round our nest, far as the eye can pass,
Are golden kingcup-fields with silver edge
Where the cow-parsley skirts the hawthorn-hedge.
‘Tis visible silence, still as the hour-glass.

Deep in the sun-searched growths the dragon-fly
Hangs like a blue thread loosened from the sky: —
So this wing’d hour is dropt to us from above.
Oh! clasp we to our hearts, for deathless dower,
This close-companioned inarticulate hour
When twofold silence was the song of love.

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Your Enemy according to Buddha

Top 5 John Keats poems

John Keats poems
John Keats

John Keats (31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821) was an English Romantic poet. He was one of the main figures of the second generation of Romantic poets, along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, despite his work having been in publication for only four years before his death. John Keats poems are characterized by sensual imagery, most notably in the series of odes. This is typical of romantic poets, as they aimed to accentuate extreme emotion through the emphasis of natural imagery. Today his poems and letters are some of the most popular and most analyzed in English literature. All John Keats poems are very inspirational and motivational.

The genius of poetry must work out its own salvation in a man; it cannot be matured by law and precept, but by sensation and watchfulness in itself.
– John Keats

Top 5 John Keats poems


1)A Thing Of Beauty (Endymion) Poem by John Keats

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever:
Its lovliness increases; it will never
Pass into nothingness; but still will keep
A bower quiet for us, and a sleep
Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.
Therefore, on every morrow, are we wreathing
A flowery band to bind us to the earth,
Spite of despondence, of the inhuman dearth
Of noble natures, of the gloomy days,
Of all the unhealthy and o’er-darkn’d ways
Made for our searching: yes, in spite of all,
Some shape of beauty moves away the pall
From our dark spirits. Such the sun, the moon,
Trees old and young, sprouting a shady boon
For simple sheep; and such are daffodils
With the green world they live in; and clear rills
That for themselves a cooling covert make
‘Gainst the hot season; the mid-forest brake,
Rich with a sprinkling of fair musk-rose blooms:
And such too is the grandeur of the dooms
We have imagined for the mighty dead;
An endless fountain of immortal drink,
Pouring unto us from the heaven’s brink.

2)Bright Star Poem by John Keats

Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art–
Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night
And watching, with eternal lids apart,
Like nature’s patient, sleepless Eremite,
The moving waters at their priestlike task
Of pure ablution round earth’s human shores,
Or gazing on the new soft-fallen mask
Of snow upon the mountains and the moors–
No–yet still stedfast, still unchangeable,
Pillow’d upon my fair love’s ripening breast,
To feel for ever its soft fall and swell,
Awake for ever in a sweet unrest,
Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath,
And so live ever–or else swoon to death.

3)When I Have Fears Poem by John Keats

When I have fears that I may cease to be
Before my pen has glean’d my teeming brain,
Before high-piled books, in charactery,
Hold like rich garners the full ripen’d grain;
When I behold, upon the night’s starr’d face,
Huge cloudy symbols of a high romance,
And think that I may never live to trace
Their shadows, with the magic hand of chance;
And when I feel, fair creature of an hour,
That I shall never look upon thee more,
Never have relish in the faery power
Of unreflecting love;–then on the shore
Of the wide world I stand alone, and think
Till love and fame to nothingness do sink.

4)Ode To A Nightingale Poem by John Keats

My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains
My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk,
Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains
One minute past, and Lethe-wards had sunk:
‘Tis not through envy of thy happy lot,
But being too happy in thy happiness,—
That thou, light-winged Dryad of the trees,
In some melodious plot
Of beechen green, and shadows numberless,
Singest of summer in full-throated ease.

O for a draught of vintage, that hath been
Cooled a long age in the deep-delved earth,
Tasting of Flora and the country green,
Dance, and Provencal song, and sun-burnt mirth!
O for a beaker full of the warm South,
Full of the true, the blushful Hippocrene,
With beaded bubbles winking at the brim,
And purple-stained mouth;
That I might drink, and leave the world unseen,
And with thee fade away into the forest dim:

Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget
What thou among the leaves hast never known,
The weariness, the fever, and the fret
Here, where men sit and hear each other groan;
Where palsy shakes a few, sad, last gray hairs,
Where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and dies;
Where but to think is to be full of sorrow
And leaden-eyed despairs;
Where beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes,
Or new love pine at them beyond tomorrow.

Away! away! for I will fly to thee,
Not charioted by Bacchus and his pards,
But on the viewless wings of Poesy,
Though the dull brain perplexes and retards:
Already with thee! tender is the night,
And haply the Queen-Moon is on her throne,
Clustered around by all her starry fays;
But here there is no light,
Save what from heaven is with the breezes blown
Through verdurous glooms and winding mossy ways.

I cannot see what flowers are at my feet,
Nor what soft incense hangs upon the boughs,
But, in embalmed darkness, guess each sweet
Wherewith the seasonable month endows
The grass, the thicket, and the fruit-tree wild;
White hawthorn, and the pastoral eglantine;
Fast-fading violets covered up in leaves;
And mid-May’s eldest child,
The coming musk-rose, full of dewy wine,
The murmurous haunt of flies on summer eves.

Darkling I listen; and for many a time
I have been half in love with easeful Death,
Called him soft names in many a mused rhyme,
To take into the air my quiet breath;
Now more than ever seems it rich to die,
To cease upon the midnight with no pain,
While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad
In such an ecstasy!
Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain—
To thy high requiem become a sod

Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird!
No hungry generations tread thee down;
The voice I hear this passing night was heard
In ancient days by emperor and clown:
Perhaps the self-same song that found a path
Through the sad heart of Ruth, when, sick for home,
She stood in tears amid the alien corn;
The same that oft-times hath
Charmed magic casements, opening on the foam
Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn.

Forlorn! the very word is like a bell
To toll me back from thee to my sole self!
Adieu! the fancy cannot cheat so well
As she is famed to do, deceiving elf.
Adieu! adieu! thy plaintive anthem fades
Past the near meadows, over the still stream,
Up the hill-side; and now ’tis buried deep
In the next valley-glades:
Was it a vision, or a waking dream?
Fled is that music:—do I wake or sleep?

6)His Last Sonnet Poem by John Keats

Bright star, would I were steadfast as thou art! –
Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night,
And watching, with eternal lids apart,
Like Nature’s patient sleepless Eremite,
The moving waters at their priestlike task
Of pure ablution round earth’s human shores,
Or gazing on the new soft fallen mask
Of snow upon the mountains and the moors –
No -yet still steadfast, still unchangeable,
Pillowed upon my fair love’s ripening breast,
To feel for ever its soft fall and swell,
Awake for ever in a sweet unrest,
Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath,
And so live ever -or else swoon to death.

Become a Spiritual Warrior

Spiritual Warrior
Be a Spiritual Warrior

Who is a Spiritual Warrior

In our day to day life we encounter many problems and hurdles with which we have to fight. We don’t just sit in a corner and wait for someone to come and solve our problems. We try our level best to overcome the difficulties and problems life throws on us. You all are courageous Warriors, because you don’t rely on others help. It’s not true that a person specialized in combat and warfare activities can only be called a Warrior. People who fight with Weapons and bombs and kill innocent men, women and children can never be called as true Warriors. A true Warrior is one who fights for truth and good of world.

A Spiritual Warrior armed with his sword of self knowledge and self control, destroys ignorance and attains a state in which there is no suffering, and selfish desires. For a true warrior his mind is his battle field and his ignorance is his enemy. He releases himself from the effects of karma and the cycle of death and rebirth. Nirvana is the final goal of a Spiritual warrior.

What is Spirituality

We can not define Spirituality precisely. Spirituality may refer to a meaningful activity, which helps in your personal growth and self-realization. Unlike religion, spirituality is associated with the interior life of the individual. Spiritual practice are your journey towards nirvana, self realization, the discovery of higher truths, and true nature of reality.

A true Spiritual warrior fights with himself because man is the worst enemy of man. Mind if controlled is our best friend if not the worst foe.

Morality, concentration and Wisdom these are the weapons of a true Spiritual Warrior which he uses to kill the Passions of lust, hatred and ignorance that resides in mind. The true Spiritual warrior combats the universal enemy, self ignorance which is the ultimate source of suffering.

The spiritual warrior’s only complete and right practice is that which compassionately helps other beings with wisdom. Hence we all should become a spiritual warrior and kill all our lust of passions, greed, immorality, self -ignorance and other negativity of the mind using the weapons of self-knowledge, self-discipline, concentration of mind, virtue and our deep common sense.

Once a spiritual warrior purifies his mind then his ultimate task is the War against the universal self ignorance, lust, greed and the negativity they produce in a persons mind. Those who prefer to battle with passions in solitude alone are perfectly free.

To a Spiritual warrior, solitude is Happiness. Those who seek delight in battle with life’s problems living in the world and thus make a happy world where men can live as ideal citizens in perfect peace and harmony, can adopt that responsibility and courage.

I believe that each and every one of you can become a Spiritual warrior. The darkness within can only be destroyed by self knowledge, not by weapons. Enlightenment should be the true goal of our life.

See Also:- Your Enemy according to Buddha

Inspirational Omar Khayyam Quotes

Omar Khayyam Quotes
Omar Khayyam

About Omar Khayyam

Omar Khayyam (18 May 1048 – 4 December 1131) was a Persian mathematician, astronomer, and writer; originally named Ghiyath al-Din Abu’l-Fath Omar ibn Ibrahim Al-Nisaburi Khayyámi . Edward FitzGerald’s translations of his poetic Rubaiyat (Quatrains) were immensely popular, and remain influential. He is widely considered to be one of the most influential scientists of the middle ages. He wrote numerous treatises on mechanics, geography, mineralogy and astronomy. Omar Khayyam Quotes from his work are very inspirational.

He is the author of one of the most important treatises on algebra written before modern times, the Treatise on Demonstration of Problems of Algebra (1070), which includes a geometric method for solving cubic equations by intersecting a hyperbola with a circle. He contributed to a calendar reform. His significance as a philosopher and teacher, and his few remaining philosophical works, have not received the same attention as his scientific and poetic writings.

Omar Khayyam Quotes

Be happy for this moment. This moment is your life.

Wake! For the Sun, who scatter’d into flight
The Stars before him from the Field of Night,
Drives Night along with them from Heav’n, and strikes
The Sultan’s Turret with a Shaft of Light.

Before the phantom of False morning died,
Methought a Voice within the Tavern cried,
“When all the Temple is prepared within,
Why nods the drowsy Worshipper outside?”

Whether at Naishapur or Babylon,
Whether the Cup with sweet or bitter run,
The Wine of Life keeps oozing drop by drop,
The Leaves of Life keep falling one by one.

A book, a woman, and a flask of wine:
The three make heaven for me; it may be thine
Is some sour place of singing cold and bare —
But then, I never said thy heaven was mine.

Ah, make the most of what we yet may spend,
Before we too into the Dust descend;
Dust into Dust, and under Dust to lie
Sans Wine, sans Song, sans Singer, and — sans End!

Myself when young did eagerly frequent
Doctor and Saint, and heard great argument
About it and about: but evermore
Came out by the same door where in I went.

With them the seed of Wisdom did I sow,
And with mine own hand wrought to make it grow;
And this was all the Harvest that I reap’d —
“I came like Water, and like Wind I go”.

There was the Door to which I found no Key;
There was the Veil through which I might not see:
Some little talk awhile of Me and Thee
There was — and then no more of Thee and Me.

A Hair perhaps divides the False and True;
Yes; and a single Alif were the clue —
Could you but find it — to the Treasure-house,
And peradventure to The Master too;

Waste not your Hour, nor in the vain pursuit
Of This and That endeavour and dispute;
Better be jocund with the fruitful Grape
Than sadden after none, or bitter, Fruit.

The Grape that can with Logic absolute
The Two-and-Seventy jarring Sects confute:
The sovereign Alchemist that in a trice
Life’s leaden metal into Gold transmute:

Oh, threats of Hell and Hopes of Paradise!
One thing at least is certain — This Life flies;
One thing is certain and the rest is Lies;
The Flower that once has blown for ever dies.

Strange, is it not? that of the myriads who
Before us pass’d the door of Darkness through,
Not one returns to tell us of the Road,
Which to discover we must travel too.

We are no other than a moving row
Of Magic Shadow-shapes that come and go
Round with the Sun-illumined Lantern held
In Midnight by the Master of the Show;

And that inverted Bowl they call the Sky,
Whereunder crawling coop’d we live and die,
Lift not your hands to It for help — for It
As impotently moves as you or I.
Yesterday This Day’s Madness did prepare;
To-morrow’s Silence, Triumph, or Despair:
Drink! for you know not whence you came, nor why:
Drink! for you know not why you go, nor where.

Oh, Thou who Man of baser Earth didst make,
And ev’n with Paradise devise the Snake:
For all the Sin wherewith the Face of Man
Is blacken’d — Man’s forgiveness give — and take!

Indeed the Idols I have loved so long
Have done my credit in this World much wrong:
Have drown’d my Glory in a shallow Cup
And sold my Reputation for a Song.

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