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Hope is the thing with feathers poem by Emily Dickinson

'Hope' is the thing with feathers  poem by Emily Dickinson
Emily Dickinson

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) was an American poet. Born in Massachusetts, to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. While Dickinson was a prolific private poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly 1,800 poems were published during her lifetime.

“Hope” is the thing with feathers –
That perches in the soul –
And sings the tune without the words –
And never stops – at all –

And sweetest – in the Gale – is heard –
And sore must be the storm –
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm –

I’ve heard it in the chillest land –
And on the strangest Sea –
Yet – never – in Extremity,
It asked a crumb – of me.

22 thoughts on “Hope is the thing with feathers poem by Emily Dickinson

  1. Ahh, I always love how clever Emily Dickinson is in her poetry. In particular, I’m in love with that first stanza. That little bit where it reads “And never stops — at all–.” Ironically, this poem pauses hope immortally for the reader’s examination. It gives “hope” a chance to be recognized in contrast to the times when we take it for granted when we’re down. Thanks for posting this & thanks for following as well! 🙂

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