Inspirational John Searle Quotes

John Rogers Searle is an American philosopher. This post features some Inspirational John Searle Quotes.

Widely noted for his contributions to the philosophy of language, philosophy of mind and social philosophy, he began teaching at Berkeley in 1959. He received the Jean Nicod Prize in 2000; the National Humanities Medal in 2004; and the Mind & Brain Prize in 2006. Among his notable concepts is the “Chinese room” argument against “strong” artificial intelligence.

John Searle Quotes
John Searle Quotes

John Searle Quotes

“An utterance can have Intentionality, just as a belief has Intentionality, but whereas the Intentionality of the belief is intrinsic the Intentionality of the utterance is derived.”
– John Searle

“You do not understand your own tradition if you do not see it in relation to others.”
– John Searle

“Whatever is referred to must exist. Let us call this the axiom of existence.”
– John Searle

“Materialism ends up denying the existence of any irreducible subjective qualitative states of sentience or awareness.”
– John Searle

“Where consciousness is concerned, the appearance is the reality.”
– John Searle

“Many people mistakenly suppose that the essence of consciousness is that of a control mechanism.”
– John Searle

“Nowadays nobody bothers, and it is considered in slightly bad taste to even raise the question of God’s existence. Matters of religion are like matters of sexual preference: they are not discussed in public, and even the abstract questions are discussed only by bores.”
– John Searle

“Dualism makes the problem insoluble; materialism denies the existence of any phenomenon to study, and hence of any problem.”
– John Searle

“Nowadays nobody bothers, and it is considered in slightly bad taste to even raise the question of God’s existence. Matters of religion are like matters of sexual preference: they are not discussed in public, and even the abstract questions are discussed only by bores.”
– John Searle

“The Intentionality of the mind not only creates the possibility of meaning, but limits its forms.”
John Searle

“It seemed to a number of philosophers of language, myself included, that we should attempt to achieve a unification of Chomsky’s syntax, with the results of the researches that were going on in semantics and pragmatics. I believe that this effort has proven to be a failure. Though Chomsky did indeed revolutionize the subject of linguistics, it is not at all clear, at the end the century, what the solid results of this revolution are. As far as I can tell there is not a single rule of syntax that all, or even most, competent linguists are prepared to agree is a rule.”
– John Searle

“Well, what does “good” mean anyway…? As Wittgenstein suggested, “good,” like “game,” has a family of meanings. Prominent among them is this one: “meets the criteria or standards of assessment or evaluation.”
– John Searle

“The assertion fallacy … is the fallacy of confusing the conditions for the performance of the speech act of assertion with the analysis of the meaning of particular words occurring in certain assertions.”
John Searle quotes

“The general nature of the speech act fallacy can be stated as follows, using “good” as our example. Calling something good is characteristically praising or commending or recommending it, etc. But it is a fallacy to infer from this that the meaning of “good” is explained by saying it is used to perform the act of commendation.”
– John Searle

“The reason that no computer program can ever be a mind is simply that a computer program is only syntactical, and minds are more than syntactical. Minds are semantical, in the sense that they have more than a formal structure, they have a content.”
– John Searle

“I want to block some common misunderstandings about understanding: In many of these discussions one finds a lot of fancy footwork about the word understanding.”
– John Searle

“We do not live in several different, or even two different, worlds, a mental world and a physical world, a scientific world and a world of common sense. Rather, there is just one world; it is the world we all live in, and we need to account for how we exist as part of it.”
– John Searle

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