Six mistakes according to Marcus Tullius Cicero

Six mistakes according to  Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero

Marcus Tullius Cicero (3 January 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC) was a Roman philosopher, politician, lawyer, orator, political theorist, consul and constitutionalist. He came from a wealthy municipal family of the Roman equestrian order, and is widely considered one of Rome’s greatest orators and prose stylists.

Below is a list of Six mistakes according to Marcus Tullius Cicero, which i think is worth sharing with you.

“Six mistakes mankind keeps making century after century:
1)Believing that personal gain is made by crushing others;
2)Worrying about things that cannot be changed or corrected;
3)Insisting that a thing is impossible because we cannot accomplish it;
4)Refusing to set aside trivial preferences;
5)Neglecting development and refinement of the mind;
6)Attempting to compel others to believe and live as we do.”

– Marcus Tullius Cicero

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16 Comments


  1. We have a tendency to define possibilities within the scope of our own limitations. We would be better off removing boundaries before we start and see where the outcome takes us.

    I enjoyed your post.

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  2. “6) Attempting to compel others to believe and live as we do.”

    Cicero may have been truer to say that “Attempting to coerce…” is the mistake, because he is apparently attempting to compel others to believe and live a certain way in making this statement. 🙂 We all try to compel others toward something, but better than imposition is proposition, which also seems to uphold the rest of the quote (1 and 5 especially).

    Interesting and enjoyable posts!

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  3. Yes, I like his point of view, & I will work to avoid those mistakes in my life. You have a very helpful, interesting site, Alchemist. Also, thank you for visiting my Jounal. I am working on a new name for all of my organization, so I will move content over there when I start using my new name.

    Thanks again, & have a good day,
    Kevin Coffman

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  4. And so now, centuries later, these mistakes are just as widely in evidence as at any time in the past. This is a great find. Who knew the Romans did listicles?

    Reply

  5. Jut because I haven’t been able to do it, doesn’t mean it’s impossible. So true! I love this list. I’m pressing it!

    Reply

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